WANDERINGS Northwards

Sculpture student. 21. Glasgow.

Read the Printed Word!

nhoagarner:

Amy Joy Watson`s geometric sculptureshttp://www.amyjoywatson.com/

The Cloud | :          AN ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIVE BALLOON STRUCTURE           I.D. 2009 Annual Design Review Environment category,           Design Distinctionxrange 十一事務所

A beacon for the 2008 Taiwan Designers’ Week, the Cloud is a self-floating temporary canopy for an outdoor plaza where the design fair is held. The Cloud defines an outdoor hang out area for events and DJ parties with its shape-shifting 900m3 mass that responds to wind movements and air pressure changes. Encased in a soft translucent sac of synthetic fibers, the Cloud filters scorching sunlight into an ephemeral glow. As air pressure drops before rain falls, the Cloud will react by lowering from its 9-12m flying height to hover just above ground, therefore “predicting” rain during the hot summer week.

The Cloud is buoyed by a 10x30x3m transparent balloon space frame. 12 balloons (d=3.5m) filled with 150,000L of helium gas are tied into a 3D web structure with the balloons acting as “nodes” and nylon ropes of varying lengths as tensile members. The Cloud combines CAD/CAM with a very simple design concept: using minimal means and everyday materials to create surprising environmentally responsive effects.

cross-connect:

Japanese artist Tanaka Tatsuya creates miniature diorama for daily calendar since 2011. His artwork titled “miniature calendar” depicts diorama-style toy people with household items, including food and vegetables. He updates his calendar-website daily with a fresh and playful image, infused with his creative imagination. Enjoy some of the awesome images.

Everyone must have had similar thoughts at least once. Broccoli and parsley might sometimes look like a forest, or the tree leaves floating on the surface of the water might sometimes look like little boats. Everyday occurrences seen from a pygmy’s perspective can bring us lots of fun thoughts.

                                    :-)

(Source: cross-connect.cc)

sciencesoup:

Strandbeests: Wind Walking Machines

Like a small god, Dutch kinetic sculptor Theo Jansen has spent the last twenty years creating wind-powered machines called “Strandbeests.” Most at home on damp stretches of beach, these stunning constructions amble across their habitat with unnervingly life-like dexterity. They are intricately built from piping, wood, and wing-like sails, and genetic algorithms are used to organise the steps of their many spindly legs. Fascinatingly, their legs are engineered so that smaller tubes are slotted within larger ones, creating “muscles” that can lengthen while walking to help the body balance. Strandbeests have evolved from rudimentary “species” to more sophisticated ones equipped to deal with their three main predators: dry sand, the sea, and storms. Jansen has given them the ability to store air pressure by capturing wind in their wings and pumping it into old lemonade bottles, so if the wind drops, the creatures can still move—perhaps to save their lives by moving clear of a rising tide. They also have primitive brains: binary step counters that tell the creature its location in its simple world of sand and dunes. Some species also have feelers that can detect both water or dry sand, which immediately kicks the strandbeest into preservation mode, making it instinctively stop and walk the opposite way. Some strandbeests can even sense when a storm is coming, and anchor themselves to the ground to survive. Eventually, Jansen hopes that herds of his breathtakingly life-like creatures can roam coastlines independent of human supervision.

Theo Jansen’s TED Talk

(Image Credit)

theenergyissue:

Self-Powered: Speculating the Future of Energy-Harvesting Wearables

Taking a cue from both our current obsession with wearables and an increasing anxiety about the future of energy, industrial designer Naomi Kizhner imagined devices that would harvest energy from our own bodies. For her final project, Energy Addicts, at Jerusalem’s Hadassah Academic College Kizhner created a theoretical line of wearables that would store the energy produced by blinks, blood flow, and synaptic pulses from the brain. A video shows how these devices might be used in a fictive, vaguely apocalyptic near future. In one scene, a woman puffs vigorously on a cigarette to raise her blood pressure as a wrist-mounted gadget containing a hydraulic turbine of gold—one of the best conductors—powers what appears to be a ubiquitous energy grid. “I wanted the project to provoke a debate,” Kizhner says. “Technically, there are developments today that can make these devices real, but theoretically speaking, I don’t know if we’re willing to sacrifice our bodies this way to make energy. It kind of dehumanizes us—it uses the body as a vessel.” On the other hand, the notion that we might all contribute—literally and viscerally—to our global energy store appears as a powerful and moving alternative to our current state, in which those who reap the benefits of energy are often not those tasked with creating it. 

(Source: fastcoexist.com)

theenergyissue:

Industrialized Meat: The Landscapes of Factory Farming

Feedlots are facilities used in factory farming—a modern form of industrialized, intensive livestock production—in which thousands of livestock are “finished” in densely-packed feeding pens. The U.S. contains over 15,000 feedlots today, and 99% percent of all farmed animals in the country are raised on one. Despite their ubiquity, agricultural companies have done their best to hide these operations. So-called “ag gag” laws, for example, have made the recording of animal cruelty in commercial farming practices illegal. According to Ted Genoways of Mother Jones, ag gag laws have been on the books in eight states and were enacted in 15 more as of 2013. Luckily, artist Mishka Henner, who has been collecting satellite imagery of feedlots for years, has been able to avoid legal repercussions. His work captures the vast scale and damaging ecological effects of industrial farming in America. As Matt Connelly notes in Mic, what appear as beautiful emerald green and ruby red pools are in fact “manure lagoons” for the highly toxic chemical animal waste produced in these concentrated enclosures. Henner has utilized open-source satellite imagery to reveal other hidden yet highly potent landscapes like oil fields and covert U.S. military bases.

theenergyissue:

"Catch of the Day" Campaign Presents Trash Fresh from the Sea

To bring attention to the issue of ocean pollution, the Surfrider Foundation teamed up with advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi LA to create the “Catch of the Day” campaign. Actual trash collected from beaches around the U.S. was re-packaged as food and left on display at farmer’s markets to create a impactful, site-specific message. By addressing consumers at the point of purchase, the “Catch of the Day” reminds seafood buyers that ocean pollution isn’t someone else’s problem; rather, it impacts individuals on a daily basis. Some of the repackaged items include cigarette butts from Venice Beach, California; aerosol cans from South Padre Beach, Texas; and condoms from Newport Beach, California. While environmental campaigns often emphasize shock value above all else, the Surfrider project tempers startling subjects with a restrained presentation and refined target audience. 

(Source: shape-and-colour.com)

notordinaryfashion:

Dolce & Gabbana Alta Moda F/W 2014-15 
Dolce&Gabbana Alta Moda Fall Winter 2014- 2015 collection features on Vogue Italia’s Unique September issue with a shoot by Steve Hiett in Capri.
A private terrace in Capri with the Faraglioni and the blue Mediterranean sea acted as a backdrop of the Dolce&Gabbana Alta Moda collection for Fall Winter 2014-2015 which showed in July. Though information was scarce, we caught a glimpse of beautifully printed gowns worn by the models of the moment arriving by boat, and plenty of extravagant applications, and furs. As the season stats, we editorials featuring the collections are beginning to surface, first among which the editorial on Vogue Unique (Vogue Italia’s September issue 2014 couture insert) shot by Steve Hiett and styled by Robert Rabensteiner. The contrast between the prints, the backdrop, the textured fur, and the signature photographic style of Hiett create a unique statement apt for Alta Moda.

notordinaryfashion:

Dolce & Gabbana Alta Moda F/W 2014-15 

A private terrace in Capri with the Faraglioni and the blue Mediterranean sea acted as a backdrop of the Dolce&Gabbana Alta Moda collection for Fall Winter 2014-2015 which showed in July. Though information was scarce, we caught a glimpse of beautifully printed gowns worn by the models of the moment arriving by boat, and plenty of extravagant applications, and furs. As the season stats, we editorials featuring the collections are beginning to surface, first among which the editorial on Vogue Unique (Vogue Italia’s September issue 2014 couture insert) shot by Steve Hiett and styled by Robert Rabensteiner. The contrast between the prints, the backdrop, the textured fur, and the signature photographic style of Hiett create a unique statement apt for Alta Moda.

(via the-morning-and-the-evening-star)