WANDERINGS Northwards

Sculpture student. 21. Glasgow.

Read the Printed Word!
likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth
"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos. 
Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull. 
Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.
Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur. 
After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.
In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

cavetocanvas:

Susan HillerDream Mapping, 1973

An art event provocatively poised between an experiment (social or scientific) and a performance without an audience. Seven dreamers slept for three nights inside “fairy rings” in an English meadow marked by an abundance of circles formed naturally by Marasmius oreades mushrooms, a landscape feature that occurs in a number of British folk myths. The field became a site for dream experiences which were discussed and mapped the following morning. The dream maps of each participant were collected and copied onto transparent paper, sandwiched together, and traced to compile a composite group map for each night. A number of shared features were noted. (via)

Copyright, Susan Hiller; Courtesy, Timothy Taylor Gallery, London.

gasoline-station:

MIMA House

by MIMA Lab | more

  …unique for its ability to be reconfigured by the owners in project and also post-delivery. The interior walls consist of lightweight panels that can be easily relocated or removed by two people. Several years have been spent refining the concept in order to arrive at a finished product that would be quick to manufacture, easy to assemble, of good quality and affordable.

The interior wall system consists of frames that are snapped into place in […] tracks. As a result, the rooms can be expanded or reduced in increments of 1.5 m. Finish panels are then attached to both sides of the wall frames.

the decor of the house can be changed just by flipping the [wood veneer] panels over. Similar panels can be used to cover the windows as needed for privacy or to block out unwanted sunlight and views.

iluvsouthernafrica:

Lesotho:

Portraits of Basotho men and women wearing *likobo by Joel Tettamanti.

(*blankets - pronounced: di-ko-bo)

Up to approximately 600 years ago furs, skins and even dried grass were used to keep out the cold during the winter months. By 1860 it was becoming more difficult to procure sufficient skins for Karosses and by 1872 many of the old sheepskin covers had been replaced by crudely made cotton or woolen blankets. 

Although blanket styles have been subject to outside influences, they are still to this day closely linked with the milestones of Basotho family life.

Read more.

(via maghrabiyya)

holdfast-collective:

Holdfast Collective is launching our seasonal zine! Submission deadline for our first issue is July 17th.
Recipes, thoughts, poems, sketches, ephemera, what have you. 

holdfast-collective:

Holdfast Collective is launching our seasonal zine! 
Submission deadline for our first issue is July 17th.

Recipes, thoughts, poems, sketches, ephemera, what have you. 

greatleapsideways:

"Many of us are prepared to believe that the unintended consequence is the chief product of our technology. Yet it gives us at least a degree of mastery over the world. It is in our experience of art that we have no control, nor should we hope for any. The images in Evidence pose questions of form and content, of intention and meaning, that permit no resolution. Our facilities roused, as William Blake puts it, we continue along the ever-branching paths of speculation. The further we go, the richer and more elusive our findings, and our stopping points can only be arbitrary. Evidence is inexhaustible.”

— Carter Ratcliff “Confronting Evidence” in Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel (2012). Photographs from Evidence, by Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel.

radiofreedotorg:

Spain Held Its Annual Devil Baby Jumping Festival

The Spanish village of Castrillo de Murcia held its annual baby jumping festival on Sunday, which involves men dressed as devils leaping over newborns in the street.
El Salto del Colacho, or the devil’s jump, celebrates the Catholic feast of Corpus Christi. This particular town, near Burgos in northern Spain, has been marking the occasion with this bizarre tradition every year since 1620. This year’s feast fell on June 19 and the El Colacho festivities culminate on the following Sunday.
Newborns are sprinkled with confetti and flower petals before being laid out on mattresses where men dressed in a yellow and red suits run and hurdle over them. The practice is meant to cleanse the infants of original sin and protect them from future evils. Afterwards, the town is also said to be cleansed of original sin.

The devil figure also chases and whips onlookers in the village.

The Corpus Christi feast is a major holiday in Spain honoring Jesus’ body and blood, and celebrating his presence at the Eucharist. In this religious tradition the Eucharist is usually celebrated by a solemn procession carrying the body of Christ through the streets. Castrillo de Murcia is the only village that celebrates the feast by men dressed as devils jumping over wailing infants.
Although no babies were harmed, the celebration is controversial for its lax safety precautions and Spanish priests have also distanced themselves from it.
But in a country where the torture and public killing of a bull is a national pastime, baby jumping might not be the strangest ceremony. Semana Santa, or the Holy Week before Easter, is marked in Andalusia with creepy pointed-hood-wearing penitents marching through the streets and swinging incense.
Then there’s goat throwing, where every January a live animal was thrown 50 feet from the top of church tower in the village of Manganeses de la Polvorosa, and caught in a sheet at the bottom. This tradition was banned in 2002, however, and this year a soft toy goat was hurled off the church instead.
Follow Olivia Becker on Twitter: @obecker928
All photos by Getty Images
Via: Vice News


http://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2014/jun/23/the-baby-jumping-festival-in-pictures?CMP=fb_gu

radiofreedotorg:

Spain Held Its Annual Devil Baby Jumping Festival
image

The Spanish village of Castrillo de Murcia held its annual baby jumping festival on Sunday, which involves men dressed as devils leaping over newborns in the street.

El Salto del Colacho, or the devil’s jump, celebrates the Catholic feast of Corpus Christi. This particular town, near Burgos in northern Spain, has been marking the occasion with this bizarre tradition every year since 1620. This year’s feast fell on June 19 and the El Colacho festivities culminate on the following Sunday.

Newborns are sprinkled with confetti and flower petals before being laid out on mattresses where men dressed in a yellow and red suits run and hurdle over them. The practice is meant to cleanse the infants of original sin and protect them from future evils. Afterwards, the town is also said to be cleansed of original sin.

image

The devil figure also chases and whips onlookers in the village.

image

The Corpus Christi feast is a major holiday in Spain honoring Jesus’ body and blood, and celebrating his presence at the Eucharist. In this religious tradition the Eucharist is usually celebrated by a solemn procession carrying the body of Christ through the streets. Castrillo de Murcia is the only village that celebrates the feast by men dressed as devils jumping over wailing infants.

Although no babies were harmed, the celebration is controversial for its lax safety precautions and Spanish priests have also distanced themselves from it.

But in a country where the torture and public killing of a bull is a national pastime, baby jumping might not be the strangest ceremony. Semana Santa, or the Holy Week before Easter, is marked in Andalusia with creepy pointed-hood-wearing penitents marching through the streets and swinging incense.

Then there’s goat throwing, where every January a live animal was thrown 50 feet from the top of church tower in the village of Manganeses de la Polvorosa, and caught in a sheet at the bottom. This tradition was banned in 2002, however, and this year a soft toy goat was hurled off the church instead.

Follow Olivia Becker on Twitter: @obecker928

All photos by Getty Images

Via: Vice News

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2014/jun/23/the-baby-jumping-festival-in-pictures?CMP=fb_gu

Daria Tuminas Daria Tuminas defines herself as both a photographer and a folklorist. Working from Amsterdam, she uses the myths and legends that grow up in small towns and villages to tell deeply personal stories, and glimpse the fairy-tale world that lurks beneath the surface of country life in Russia. Photograph: Daria Tuminasdariatuminas.com

Daria Tuminas

Daria Tuminas defines herself as both a photographer and a folklorist. Working from Amsterdam, she uses the myths and legends that grow up in small towns and villages to tell deeply personal stories, and glimpse the fairy-tale world that lurks beneath the surface of country life in Russia. Photograph: Daria Tuminas

dariatuminas.com

jedavu:

THE DARK SIDE OF DREAMS 

In the late 1960’s, photographer Arthur Tress began a series of photographs that were inspired by the dreams of children. Tress had each child he approached tell him about a prominent dream of theirs which Tress would then artistically re-create and photograph with the child as the main subject. 

(via luminarystudies)