WANDERINGS Northwards

Sculpture student. 21. Glasgow.

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theenergyissue:

Self-Powered: Speculating the Future of Energy-Harvesting Wearables

Taking a cue from both our current obsession with wearables and an increasing anxiety about the future of energy, industrial designer Naomi Kizhner imagined devices that would harvest energy from our own bodies. For her final project, Energy Addicts, at Jerusalem’s Hadassah Academic College Kizhner created a theoretical line of wearables that would store the energy produced by blinks, blood flow, and synaptic pulses from the brain. A video shows how these devices might be used in a fictive, vaguely apocalyptic near future. In one scene, a woman puffs vigorously on a cigarette to raise her blood pressure as a wrist-mounted gadget containing a hydraulic turbine of gold—one of the best conductors—powers what appears to be a ubiquitous energy grid. “I wanted the project to provoke a debate,” Kizhner says. “Technically, there are developments today that can make these devices real, but theoretically speaking, I don’t know if we’re willing to sacrifice our bodies this way to make energy. It kind of dehumanizes us—it uses the body as a vessel.” On the other hand, the notion that we might all contribute—literally and viscerally—to our global energy store appears as a powerful and moving alternative to our current state, in which those who reap the benefits of energy are often not those tasked with creating it. 

(Source: fastcoexist.com)

theenergyissue:

Industrialized Meat: The Landscapes of Factory Farming

Feedlots are facilities used in factory farming—a modern form of industrialized, intensive livestock production—in which thousands of livestock are “finished” in densely-packed feeding pens. The U.S. contains over 15,000 feedlots today, and 99% percent of all farmed animals in the country are raised on one. Despite their ubiquity, agricultural companies have done their best to hide these operations. So-called “ag gag” laws, for example, have made the recording of animal cruelty in commercial farming practices illegal. According to Ted Genoways of Mother Jones, ag gag laws have been on the books in eight states and were enacted in 15 more as of 2013. Luckily, artist Mishka Henner, who has been collecting satellite imagery of feedlots for years, has been able to avoid legal repercussions. His work captures the vast scale and damaging ecological effects of industrial farming in America. As Matt Connelly notes in Mic, what appear as beautiful emerald green and ruby red pools are in fact “manure lagoons” for the highly toxic chemical animal waste produced in these concentrated enclosures. Henner has utilized open-source satellite imagery to reveal other hidden yet highly potent landscapes like oil fields and covert U.S. military bases.

theenergyissue:

"Catch of the Day" Campaign Presents Trash Fresh from the Sea

To bring attention to the issue of ocean pollution, the Surfrider Foundation teamed up with advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi LA to create the “Catch of the Day” campaign. Actual trash collected from beaches around the U.S. was re-packaged as food and left on display at farmer’s markets to create a impactful, site-specific message. By addressing consumers at the point of purchase, the “Catch of the Day” reminds seafood buyers that ocean pollution isn’t someone else’s problem; rather, it impacts individuals on a daily basis. Some of the repackaged items include cigarette butts from Venice Beach, California; aerosol cans from South Padre Beach, Texas; and condoms from Newport Beach, California. While environmental campaigns often emphasize shock value above all else, the Surfrider project tempers startling subjects with a restrained presentation and refined target audience. 

(Source: shape-and-colour.com)

notordinaryfashion:

Dolce & Gabbana Alta Moda F/W 2014-15 
Dolce&Gabbana Alta Moda Fall Winter 2014- 2015 collection features on Vogue Italia’s Unique September issue with a shoot by Steve Hiett in Capri.
A private terrace in Capri with the Faraglioni and the blue Mediterranean sea acted as a backdrop of the Dolce&Gabbana Alta Moda collection for Fall Winter 2014-2015 which showed in July. Though information was scarce, we caught a glimpse of beautifully printed gowns worn by the models of the moment arriving by boat, and plenty of extravagant applications, and furs. As the season stats, we editorials featuring the collections are beginning to surface, first among which the editorial on Vogue Unique (Vogue Italia’s September issue 2014 couture insert) shot by Steve Hiett and styled by Robert Rabensteiner. The contrast between the prints, the backdrop, the textured fur, and the signature photographic style of Hiett create a unique statement apt for Alta Moda.

notordinaryfashion:

Dolce & Gabbana Alta Moda F/W 2014-15 

A private terrace in Capri with the Faraglioni and the blue Mediterranean sea acted as a backdrop of the Dolce&Gabbana Alta Moda collection for Fall Winter 2014-2015 which showed in July. Though information was scarce, we caught a glimpse of beautifully printed gowns worn by the models of the moment arriving by boat, and plenty of extravagant applications, and furs. As the season stats, we editorials featuring the collections are beginning to surface, first among which the editorial on Vogue Unique (Vogue Italia’s September issue 2014 couture insert) shot by Steve Hiett and styled by Robert Rabensteiner. The contrast between the prints, the backdrop, the textured fur, and the signature photographic style of Hiett create a unique statement apt for Alta Moda.

(via the-morning-and-the-evening-star)

guardian:

In Greek mythology, Sisyphus was condemned for eternity to push a boulder up a hill only for it to roll down again.

In San Francisco, artist Lee Materazzi decided to create her own mini version of the myth in her garage, creating installations and dismantling them as soon as they were done. 

“A lot of the everyday things people do are like pushing a boulder up a hill to then just have it topple back down – laundry for one.” More photos »

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2014/sep/07/labours-of-love-in-the-garage-in-pictures?CMP=fb_gu

theenergyissue:

Olafur Eliasson’s “Riverbed” Converts a Museum into a Natural Landscape

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson, known for his large-scale installations employing elemental materials like light, water, earth, and even atmosphere, transformed an entire wing of Denmark’s Louisiana Museum of Modern Art into a riverbed for his first solo exhibition. The work, which uses rocks, soil, and running water to precisely emulate a natural landscape, stands in stark contrast to the white walls of one of Denmark’s most important Modernist buildings. Originally designed in 1958 by architects Jørgen Bo and Wilhlem Wohlert, the Louisiana’s staggered, irregularly sized portals create an experience that highlights movement through space. By filling the Louisiana with a landscape its galleries might have replaced, Eliasson heightens the haptic qualities of this experience and points to the reality of the museum as an institution and a physical locality. The work raises the question of how natural and built environments might intersect, though it is up to the viewer to decide whether this tension is constructive or destructive.

(Source: dezeen.com)